Nick Redfern, who’s latest book, The Roswell UFO Conspiracy, is causing much ado, will be a guest tonight on Coast to Coast.

Speaking of Nick’s new book — which I haven’t read yet, but plan to of course — it’s funny, in a typical UFO Land kind of way, how much controversy his book has caused. (The Roswell UFO Conspiracy is a sequel to Body Snatchers in the Desert.)
I have no idea what happened at Roswell, and aliens crashing their spaceships on a ranch seems possible. So do heinous acts by governments. The first, true folklore. (Which does not mean it isn’t also true.) But it’s a classic narrative of aliens in the desert, and has become a part of popular culture. Everyone knows what you mean when you cite Roswell, regardless of acceptance of such things as aliens from space. The latter, well, that’s more troublesome. People, including many UFO researchers, don’t want to go there. They don’t want to get deep into dark conspiracies. I mean, good god, no one wants to even hint they’re an Alex Jones. Also, many a UFO researcher is, bewilderingly, politically conservative, and actually trusts the government.
The truth is the truth, be it aliens or government (ours, some other, …), or private technologies as in global illuminati cabal types. Whatever the answer to Roswell, it is important we keep ourselves open, and be willing to really see the truth when, and if, it arrives.

Redfern himself writes about reactions to his book at Mysterious Universe: When Ufologists Turn on Ufologists.
I don’t know if Redfern’s book is close to any truth or not. But at least he’s offering us something new and we need to be willing to adjust the ways we consider what happened at Roswell.